Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain addressed the four possible areas of discussion during a debate on the Eire Act on 5 May 1938 together: “The first was the question of division; the second, defence; third, funding; and the fourth, trade. As early as 1938, it was clear that the Taoiseach, Éamon de Valera, wanted to try to keep Ireland out of the coming war. He had been totally disillusioned by the League of Nations. On December 15, 12, Robert Barton was questioned by Kevin O`Higgins about his notes on Lloyd George`s statement on the signing of the agreement or the renewal of the war: “Did Mr. Lloyd George choose Mr. Barton as the left wing of the delegation and did he say, “The man who opposes peace can now and forever take responsibility for a terrible and immediate war?” Barton replied: “What he said was that the signature and recommendation of each member of the delegation was necessary, or that war would follow immediately, and that the responsibility for that war should lie directly with those who refused to sign the treaty.” This was brushed aside by opponents of the treaty as convenient proof that Irish delegates were forced at the last minute, and “terrible and immediate war” became a slogan in subsequent debates. [25] The next day, de Valera repeated this point: “This is why we were threatened with immediate violence against our people. I believe that this document was signed under duress, and although I have a moral feeling that any agreement reached should be faithfully executed, I will not hesitate to say that I would not consider it binding on the Irish nation. [26] The Taoiseach faced opposition within his own delegation because of his position on division. . . .